The Nantucket Boys & Girls Club was founded in 1945 with less than 230 members. Today, there are over 700 members with 300 attending daily. In order for the Club to continue supporting the community, a significant expansion and renovation was required.

One of the reasons that collaborative delivery methods are gaining market share is that, because site work can overlap with the creation of working drawings, many months can be trimmed off the schedule. There are potential cost savings to be had, as well, but as Oliver Snider explained in a recent blog post at Athletic Business, not all collaborative methods are created equal.

Success in design and construction is increasingly being gauged as much by the process as by the outcome. This is a trend being driven by building owners, who more and more are turning to collaborative, streamlined processes such as design-build that can shave months off the building schedule and save hundreds of thousands, even millions, in building costs.

Current wisdom holds that in order to keep teens involved in public recreation, they should be given space to call their own. However, one of the fundamental tenets of building security is that interiors should be designed for ease of supervision. During its recent renovation and addition, the Nantucket Boys & Girls Club wrestled with this question, discussing at length two design possibilities that were on opposite ends of the spectrum.

Sweet Briar College has managed so far to stave off financial insolvency and its planned 2015 closing — though it took four different lawsuits, a mediation agreement and the replacement of its board and president to reopen the campus for the 2015-16 school year. Daunting challenges remain, and early estimates of enrollment for 2015-16 (down to less than 300 from 530 last year) make the need for short- and long-term planning acute.

Construction Update From Nantucket:

Recently, Jonathan Nimerfroh of Runway Bride Nantucket took photos of the construction on the Nantucket Boys & Girls Club Renovation and Addition, which showcase all the progress. While the full set can be viewed in our gallery, here are some highlights:

Size isn’t an impediment to getting a great building for your campus, but hiring an architect who doesn’t understand the specific needs of a small institution can be a real impediment to a project’s success. As Stanmar’s Oliver Snider explains in a recent feature story in Private University Products & News, small institutions’ challenges only begin with the need for cost certainty.

As an Owner, understanding the risks during various stages of construction plays a large role in knowing when to be concerned and when to relax and let your contractor handle a problem. Ralph Agostinelli, Stanmar’s senior project manager, broke down a fitness center construction timeline in the November’s issue of Private University Product and News to help illuminate what to look for.

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub project is $2 billion over budget and six years behind schedule. While the numbers are shocking and scale overwhelming, this scenario plays out on typical campus projects beset by scope creep. Oliver Snider, Vice President of Business Development, recently shared his thoughts in Athletic Business


This summer, Dr. Wylie, President at Endicott College, sat down with our team to talk about Stanmar, Inc.’s impact on campus over the last 15 years. In 1999, we designed and constructed the Post Sports Science and Fitness Center, and in 2008 we were invited back to campus to design and construct the Walter J. Manninen Center for the Arts. We are very proud of our legacy on campus!

To learn more about our projects at Endicott College, visit out our case study.